SciThri new releases: October 2012

This month’s roundup of newly-released, or new to me, indie science & medical thrillers.  These books are among the many I don’t have time to read and review, but genre fans might enjoy.

If you are an author or publicist and would like your book listed, contact me with title, author, release date, weblinks, and summary. Only books with scientific or medical themes or characters will be included. Ask me about hosting a giveaway raffle on your behalf (paper books only).

SciThri New (or new to me) Releases:

Significance by Lise Sonntag. Indie mystery with math/science elements.

In the middle of a freezing German winter, the chair of mathematics at a venerable university is murdered in an apparently motiveless crime. Inspector Falco Baumgarten of the Leipzig Polizeidirektion finds himself embroiled in a mystery that refuses to be unravelled, until a chance meeting with pattern recognition expert Professor Antje Bach reveals a series of connections that will lead to an extraordinary discovery.

Blending science and philosophy, fact and fiction – ‘Significance’ is both a fascinating tour of scientific history and a cunning whodunnit, all set in one of Europe’s great cities as it comes to terms with life after the fall of the Berlin wall.

Morton’s Fork: A Doctor’s Dilemma by Dale Coy, M.D.  2012. Indie medical novel.

Roger Hartley is a dedicated old-school physician who prides himself on knowing his patients by name and promptly returning their calls. But squeezed by the new economics of health care, his tidy world begins to unravel when an uninsured patient slaps him with a frivolous lawsuit. At the mercy of an unjust legal system, Hartley reaches his breaking point and commits a rash act that unexpectedly thrusts him into the center of a hot-button political issue. Chaos ensues as the worlds of law and medicine collide. The original malpractice lawsuit becomes the least of Hartley’s troubles. Morton’s Fork is a thought-provoking social commentary that provides unique insight into the heart and soul of a doctor. Author Dale Coy, with twenty years of experience as an internist, leaves the reader with a greater understanding of tort reform and the issues that derail our health care system.

Generation by William Knight. Indie crime thriller/horror with science.

In 2001 scientists isolated the gene for regenerating damaged organs from the DNA of a South American flatworm. Within five years it had been spliced into the chromosomes of a rhesus monkey, transported through the cell walls by a retro-virus denuded of its own genetic material. Attempting to regrow impaired or elderly tissues, a scientist will one day modify the DNA of human beings by injecting the gene-carrying virus. It is just a matter of time.

Before consenting to treatment, you may want to ask a simple question: could there be a situation in which you would want to die but were unable to do so?

Journalist Hendrix ‘Aitch’ Harrison links bodies stolen from a renowned forensic-research lab to an influential drug company. Aided by Sarah Wallace, a determined and beguiling entomologist, he delves into a grisly world of clinical trials and a viral treatment beyond imagining. Aitch must battle more than his fear of technology to expose the macabre fate of the drugged victims donated to scientific research.

iFrankenstein by Bekka Black. Unconventional indie YA with tech.

A modern re-telling of Frankenstein, using only text messages, web browsers, tweets, and emails.

Homeschooled teenager Victor Frankenstein is determined to write his own ticket to independence: a chatbot to win the prestigious Turing prize and admission to the high tech university of his choice. He codes his creation with a self-extending version of his own online personality and unleashes it upon the internet. But soon he begins to suspect his virtual clone may have developed its own goals, and they are not aligned with Victor’s. The creature has its own plan, fed by a growing desire to win darker and more precious prizes: unfettered power and release from loneliness.

As the creature’s power and sentience grows and its increasingly terrible deeds bleed over from the online world into the real one, Victor must stop his creation before his friends and humanity pay the ultimate price.

Sirene by Andrew Ives. Indie thriller/mystery with scientific themes.

In the spring of 2014, a French private investigator follows the trail of a marine scientist who disappears on his way to Italy. As the aquatic bird and fish population is coincidentally affected around the same time as big business moves into this sleepy coastal area, rumours of a powerful infrasound device circulate.

The Diet Cola Scenario by Ross Cossins. Indie science thriller.

President Harry Williams needs a permanent solution to the cocaine problem and it is proposed by scientist and first female Prime Minister of Australia, Dr Janice Holloway. Three years later the horrific death of a US Senator is broadcast live while delivering a speech at the White House celebrating the eradication of cocaine. Fearing the Senator’s death may be caused by a biological weapon, the President quarantines the White House. A newspaper journalist covering the press conference videos the Senator’s dying confession which mentions a mysterious ‘diet cola scenario’. Stunned by a secret FBI report, Williams warns the world of an emerging pandemic and publicly names a powerful Mexican drug cartel, as the terrorist organization responsible. Facing financial ruin the cartel prepares to launch a terrifying assault on the United States. The President’s choice is simple: either accept defeat by the cartel or respond to the threat and risk monetary and political chaos.

Privacy Wars: A Cybertech Thriller by John Trudel. 2012. Indie technothriller.

The 21st Century sees a return of the totalitarian horrors that once caused genocide and World War. Big Brother is ascendant, aided by technology. Everyone is watched. Liberty has been traded for safety and both are lost. Personal privacy has been stolen and must be recovered.

Young scientist WILLIAM GILES fights for freedom. He and his dad, IRON JOHN, a retired Special Ops Colonel, establish Cybertech. It sells security protection for private citizens. When John is abducted and presumed dead, Cybertech is attacked from all sides. Will stands alone, tortured by remorse and falsely accused. With all he loves at risk, he runs for safety, fleeing wrongful charges, and relentlessly pursued by UN paramilitary forces.

A former student REBECCA RIDER is sent to get him to shelter. She rescues him in the high mountains. Their main allies are the Yakuza and her friends, an ancient cult that possesses advanced science. Both groups seek Cybertech’s technology. How can either be trusted?

The Messenger by Stephen Miller. 2012.  Bioterrorism thriller.

In a world of heightened threat levels, sleeper cells, and unseen enemies, one novel explores the war on terrorism with harrowing suspense . . . and deep humanity.

Daria emerges from a refugee camp a believer. She has lost everything, witnessed the unthinkable, and committed herself to a mission with a deadly conclusion. Indoctrinated, trained, and given a ticket to New York, she blends in, posing as an ambitious journalist—an “arrow” hoping to hit too many targets to count.

Dr. Sam Watterman is recruited too. Falsely accused and disgraced in the anthrax inquiries after 9/11, he is no longer a believer in causes. But the government that ruined his career now demands his expertise to locate a threat putting millions of Americans in peril.

In a country that fights wars on foreign soil but remains terrified of the cataclysm at home, Sam strives toward redemption and Daria desperately seeks both rebellion and enlightenment. Their lives will intersect at a place that will test their faith and make them each question what it means to have something worth dying for.

With a riveting plot that spans sixteen fraught, compelling days, Stephen Miller’s dazzling novel of literary suspense brings the war to a landscape both familiar and vulnerable: the America we call home.

**********

Do you enjoy thrillers with real science? Read Petroplague by Dr. Amy Rogers.
Oil-eating bacteria contaminate the fuel supply of Los Angeles and paralyze the city.
“Compellingly written, technically literate”
“top 5 on my best of 2011 list”
“the science is utterly believable”
“I couldn’t put this one down”

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